Scientists' Blog


The GLOBE Scientists' Blog is an online collaborative effort where scientists associated with GLOBE post their thoughts, comments, and philosophies about a variety of science topics.

GLOBE strongly encourages positive and productive discussions to further advance the scientific understanding of all involved with The GLOBE Program.

Blog entries made to the Scientists' blog prior to 2014 can be found in the blog archives. Archived blogs are for reference only and cannot be commented on.

Each of GLOBE's Working Groups also has a blog.  Click on the links to read each blog.

Education Working Group | Evaluation Working Group | Science Working Group | Technology Working Group

 



We are pleased to welcome guest blogger Jacob Spivey. Jacob is a senior undergraduate in Meteorology with a minor in Climatology at Penn State University. Fascinated by weather extremes as he was growing up, today he looks at possible relationships between extreme weather and climate change. Within the past few years, he has also begun looking at how these subjects are communicated to the general public, a process which he has started doing himself in his online blog,  Weatherbolt . Ask someone what they think of when they hear about climate change, and you might get a...
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See  https://www.facebook.com/groups/602168936587444/  
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Why should we study mosquitos in our area? By Mullica Jaroensutasinee, Krisanadej Jaroensutasinee, Walailak University Rebecca Boger, Brooklyn College and Elena Sparrow, UAF Before we try to answer this, we should ask ourselves about how much do we know about them? For example, how many mosquito species present in our area? Would they carry some diseases? Where are their main breeding sites? Would they prefer to bite kids than adults and elderly? What time of year? What time of day would they most active (biting us)? Let us give you some example on mosquitos that...
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Thai Coral Reef and Climate Change Assoc. Prof. Krisanadej Jaroensutasinee, Assoc. Prof. Dr. Mullica Jaroensutasinee, Centre of Excellence for Ecoinformatics, Walailak University, Thailand Everybody loves to spend their vacation snorkling or diving, seeing coral reef, reef fish and other marine creature. Would it be very sad when we go diving and see lots of dead corals? Of course, we would. What can we do to prevent this to happen? How can we and our students involve in some coral conservation? It is everyone responsibility to help improve our world to be a better place to live...
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look for a colleague from university of India (nanomaterials) to collaborate with him
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