Community Blogs

Community Blogs
 

Included below is a feed of the latest blog posts created by the GLOBE Community. To view a tutorial on how you can create a blog click here 

Community Member Blog Aggregator




Have you been taking lots of GLOBE data for the El Niño Student Research Campaign? Now that you have all the data, what can you do with it? There are lots of cool ways to make sense of your data by sharing your WATER STORIES via the H2yOu Project and El Niño stories via the Story Maps Project. By analyzing your El Niño protocol data, you can develop stories that will tell the rest of the world how the El Niño phenomena has affected your area. Perhaps students in other parts of the world have collected data similar to yours. You can also take your data and develop a project for the GLOBE...


Posted in: Field Campaigns: El Niño Investigation Areas: Atmosphere Earth As a System Hydrosphere Pedosphere (Soil) Biosphere Primary Audience: Trainers Teachers Students Partners Scientists Alumni Country Coordinators

Earlier this summer, scientists predicted about a 75% chance of a La Niña following the El Niño from 2015-2016. But now, a La Niña is most likely not going to happen, with a 40% chance as of September. Last Spring, waters in the Pacific Ocean seemed to be cooling off. This is an indicator of a La Niña weather pattern. Scientists have now noticed that these water temperatures have been leveling off, thus decreasing the chance of a La Niña event. The current ENSO period of neutrality will continue into the Fall. Monthly sea surface temperature in the Niño 3.4 region of the tropical...


Posted in: Field Campaigns: El Niño Investigation Areas: Atmosphere Earth As a System Hydrosphere Pedosphere (Soil) Biosphere Primary Audience: Trainers Teachers Students Partners Scientists Alumni Country Coordinators

As you might know, NASA came out with a statement that July 2016 was the hottest month on record, ever! Since the 2015-2016 El Niño event began in October 2015, each month has set a new record for the hottest month on record. Even though we are currently in a period of neutrality, we are on the tails of an El Niño and quite possibly about to enter a La Niña. "Since October 2015, every month has set a new global record for hottest temperatures. It coincides with an unusually strong El Niño Pattern which caused severe heat and drought across Southeast Asia, as well as raising...


Posted in: Field Campaigns: El Niño Investigation Areas: Atmosphere Earth As a System Hydrosphere Pedosphere (Soil) Biosphere Primary Audience: Trainers Teachers Students Partners Scientists Alumni Country Coordinators

Blog originally posted on The GLOBE Scientists' Blog: http://blog.globe.gov/sciblog/2013/02/13/globe-and-the-landsat-launch/ This week we have a guest blogger, Jennifer Bourgeault.  Jennifer, a member of the GLOBE Land Cover/Biology Team for 10 years, is the North Country Education Services (NCES) New Hampshire GLOBE Partnership coordinator and Master Trainer in the Land Cover/Biology protocols.  She thinks everyone should know how to use the Modified UNESCO Classification (MUC) Field Guide to classify land cover and how to use Multispec to look at change over time. ...


Posted in: GLOBE Science Topics: General Science Earth as a System Investigation Areas: Biosphere

Blog originally posted on the GLOBE Scientists' Blog: http://blog.globe.gov/sciblog/2013/01/23/trees-in-trouble-what-affect-does-tree-mortality-have-on-climate-change/ Through our trees in trouble series, we’ve examined trees in the Sahel zone in Africa and the United States.  This problem, climate change and dying trees, has been seen on every continent, the only exception being Antarctica, due to the lack of vegetation on the frozen continent.  Scientists have recently found that there is an alarming loss rate of big, old trees, whose ages range from 100-300+ years, in...


Posted in: GLOBE Science Topics: General Science Climate Change Climate Investigation Areas: Atmosphere Biosphere

Most trees obtain water through their massive root systems, but did you know that some trees can absorb water through their leaves as well? This ability is called foliar uptake. Scientists recently discovered that trees in cloud forests use foliar uptake to obtain water. A cloud forest is a forest that has persistent or seasonally persistent fog or low-level cloud cover. Cloud forests are usually in the tropics or subtropics, have evergreen trees (trees that don’t lose their leaves) and tend to have a lot of mosses and vegetation in the understory of the trees. Cloud Forest located...


Posted in: GLOBE Science Topics: Earth System Science Investigation Areas: Earth As a System Biosphere