GLOBE STARS

Stars and STEM Stories

Asset-Herausgeber


12/09/2010
Teachers Represent GLOBE at International Polar Year Oslo Science Conference
The International Polar Year (IPY) Oslo Science Conference, the largest ever Global Impact Gathering, took place from 6-12 June 2010. The event included polar and climate scientists from all over the world, members of indigenous peoples from Scandinavia and Russia, dignitaries from Norway and other European countries including Crown Prince Haakon as well as Prince Albert of Monaco, young polar scientists from the Association of Polar Early Career Scientists (APECS) and many GLOBE community members including GLOBE Program Seasons and Biomes phenology scientist and U.S. Partner, Dr. Elena Sparrow, who also served on the overall conference organizing committee.  >>

08/11/2010
GLOBE Alumni in Estonia Lead 13th GLOBE Games & Expedition
On Monday, 2 August, 2010, the GLOBE community attending the 14th GLOBE Annual Partner Meeting and Professional Development Workshop in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, received a special surprise. GLOBE Estonia Country Coordinator Dr. Kaido Reivelt and Estonian GLOBE Alumni Janno Jõgeva and Laura Altin linked to the conference through Skype to talk about their 13th Annual GLOBE Games & Expedition Event taking place at the same time! Reivelt and his assistant, Mr. Karli Kütt, also a former GLOBE student and graduate student with a degree in physics, planned the overall event.  >>

06/10/2010
GLOBE Europe-Eurasia Region Plans for Climate Research Campaign
On 1-6 June 2010, 42 representatives from 22 European countries met in Ohrid, Macedonia, to discuss regional governance, hold elections of new officers, update one another on national implementation activities and GLOBE student research underway, and begin preparation for GLOBE's upcoming climate research events.  >>

02/11/2010
Croatian Students Analyze Effects of City Lights with Five Years of GLOBE at Night Data
Since 2006, GLOBE has invited students around the world to take part in GLOBE at Night, a global campaign to measure night sky brightness. Participants choose a clear night during the two week campaign each year to go outside and observe the constellation Orion between 8 and 10pm local time, match the appearance of their sky with one of seven GLOBE Magnitude Charts, and enter their observations into the GLOBE at Night website. From this international-scale comparison, students learn about the effects of light pollution, defined as any unnecessary, useless emission of light in space outside the zone that needs to be illuminated. Often, light pollution occurs due to the use of bad lighting fixtures and incorrectly set lighting.  >>