Community Blogs
 

Included below is a feed of the latest blog posts created by the GLOBE Community. To view a tutorial on how you can create a blog click here 



The kids learned to assess a problem for solutions today when the Thermometer did work  Then the log in didn't work and they still told me where to go to resolve this. https://www.wunderground.com/us/ca/lake-balboa   °F Overcast Boston, MA 51.3 °F Partly Cloudy Houston, TX 84.8 °F Partly Cloudy San Francisco, CA 70.5 °F Partly Cloudy   Lake Balboa, CA 3:43 PM PDT on April 20, 2016 (GMT -0700) South Northridge | Report | Change Station Report Station You are about to report this weather station for bad data. Please...


Posted in:

Looking for collaborators on the GOES-R Weather Watchers Project. Let's bring the satellite and STEM education community together!


Posted in:

Berks Nature is the new Northeast Mid-Atlantic regional partner forum member. My name is Michael Griffith and my email address is michael.griffith@berksnature.org. If you have any question please feel free to contact me. My main background is water, birds, and bugs, but I am familiar with all the protocols. We are here to help you with education in anyway possible. All my contact information is below.     Work Bio  Michael J. Griffith Education & Watershed Specialist Michael joined our staff in August of 2015. He has volunteered for many environmental...


Posted in:

This is the second half to a blog posted on 25 March 2016. To see part one, click here . We are pleased that our guest blogger, Jacob Spivey, is back to share more information about oceans and climate. Jacob also blogs at Weatherbolt .  If part of the ocean has a lower salinity, then it’s going to be less dense and there won’t be as much sinking water there. This can trigger the slowdown of another circulation, the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation, or AMOC (thank goodness scientists abbreviate some of the names that they come up with!). Like the GTC, this is another...


Posted in:

Our swim off the shore of the Antarctic continent was coined as the “polar plunge.”  Plunge is a verb meaning “to jump quickly and energetically.”  I did just that – the quicker I got in, the sooner I could get right back out!  I plunged holding a bucket to collect the day’s water sample from Neko Harbor.  Since I had jumped into the Arctic’s water last June ( read here ), I was confident I could do this.  I knew just what to expect:  frigid water cold enough to feel like a million needles.  Probably overconfident from the excitement, the...


Posted in: