currently lead The GLOBE Program in Japan.

Drs. Shuji Yamashita and Tomoyasu Yoshitomi

Drs. Shuji Yamashita and Tomoyasu Yoshitomi currently lead the GLOBE Program in Japan. The two scientists are colleagues at Tokyo Gakugei University that houses the Field Studies Institute for Environmental Education (FSIFEE).

Drs. Shuji Yamashita (right) and Tomoyasu Yoshitomi (left) currently lead the GLOBE Program in Japan. The two scientists are colleagues at Tokyo Gakugei University that houses the Field Studies Institute for Environmental Education (FSIFEE). The GLOBE Japan center is comprised of faculty from FSIFEE's field of Soil Science, Environmental Education and Fish Biology and the University's departments of Physics, Physical Geography and Conservation Ecology that conduct research in the methodology of field studies and promote environmental education in schools. With support from Japans' Ministry of Education, Culture, Sport, Science and Technology, the GLOBE Japan Center at the FSIFEE supports 16 model GLOBE schools, training workshops for teachers and student and teacher conferences.

Dr. Yamashita has been participating in GLOBE since the Program began in 1995 and has served as Country Coordinator since 2001. Originally working as a climatologist and physical geographer focused on urban climate studies, air pollution and bio-meteorological issues, Dr. Yamashita was a geography faculty member at the University where he remains affiliated –after 26 years– as Emeritus Professor.

Dr. Yoshitomi is associate professor at the FSIFEE and has served as Secretary General of the GLOBE Japan Center since 2005. His professional focus is fish biology and environmental education and his special interest is environmental exhibition design in aquariums and field museums.

The staff of the GLOBE Japan Center (above) conduct GLOBE trainings along with staff not pictured here: Dr. Misao Oi, Dr. Mikio Kimata, Prof. Eichiro Harako, and Dr. Yasunori Sawada. Their diverse backgrounds enable them to train all GLOBE protocols –from atmosphere to GPS– during two-day training events that take place annually in June. Every other year, a student conference takes place where students present the results of their field studies and GLOBE research. Staff members also visit GLOBE schools for the exchange of information and knowledge and for the purpose of keeping in touch with each school's unique needs.

The staff originally was focused on the  Environmental Investigation and Learning Networks (EILENet) which was composed six special programs: urban heat island phenomena, commuting with water, acid deposition and its effects, dandelions in the environment, food culture and lifestyle, and soundscapes. However, this program was absorbed into the GLOBE Program, which encourages an integrated approach to the study of local issues across the curriculum, through the use of GLOBE protocols.

This year, our GLOBE colleagues in Japan intend to publish the results of GLOBE activities in Japan, in Japanese.

"It is very important for students to be able to examine their own environment with their own original data from a global perspective. GLOBE helps students ‘think globally, act locally.'" said Dr. S. Yamashita.


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