GLOBE STARS

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10/03/2007
SCUBAnauts International and GLOBE Begin Research Collaborations with Operation: Deep Climb
A group of 21 young explorers from the Tampa Bay Chapter of SCUBAnauts International will engage in an extraordinary journey to the middle of the Pacific Ocean from 11-21 October 2007. The mission, known as Operation: Deep Climb, will take local middle and high-school aged students from the deep depths of the ocean to the summit of the tallest mountain in the world, and into the universe beyond. Gathering GLOBE atmosphere and hydrology data will be a part of this exciting scientific expedition. The SCUBAnaut mission banner will be flown on the STS-123 Space Shuttle Mission in February 2008 to officially accomplish the mission to inspire a new generation of 21st Century Explorers and promote scientific understanding of the universe and marine environment.  >>

07/24/2007
Ohio Students Incorporate GLOBE Data into Research Projects Related to International Polar Year
On 20 April 2007, over 600 5th - 12th grade students and teachers gathered from 21 Ohio schools to present and showcase their GLOBE research projects at the first annual OhioView SATELLITES Geospatial Technology Conference at the Great Lakes Science Center in Cleveland, Ohio. OhioView, a grassroots organization founded in 1996, promotes the low-cost distribution of U.S. Government satellite data for public use.  >>

06/26/2007
GLOBE Students in France and the U.S. Meet via Video Conferences
GLOBE students at Felten Middle School in Hays, Kansas have been learning a lot about GLOBE's hands-on activities and international collaboration in space science. They have been focusing on CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared pathfinder Satellite Observation), a satellite launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base in Lompoc, CA on 28 April 2006, a joint effort of NASA in the U.S. and CNES (the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales) in France.  >>

04/26/2007
Students in Norfork, Arkansas Predict the Arrival Date of Ruby-Throated Hummingbirds in their Migration Path North
At Norfork Elementary School in Norfork, Arkansas, Wade Geery, a trained GLOBE teacher, and his sixth grade students are anxiously waiting for the arrival of the first Ruby-throated Hummingbird, on the birds' spring migration path from Central America to Canada. The students have been collecting data on the Ruby-throated Hummingbirds for the past two years: observing the first arrival dates of each gender, noting the relative number of hummingbirds throughout each season, observing what flowers the birds visit and noting the departure date of the last hummingbird in the birds' fall migration to Central America.  >>

04/22/2007
Camp Tyler Earth Day 2007
GLOBE Partner Michael Odell, from the University of Texas at Tyler, led GLOBE activities in the Camp Tyler Earth Day 2007 Event in Tyler, Texas. Preservice students from the UT-Tyler teacher preparation program led children and parents through some of the GLOBE biometry protocols. Children learned how to make a simple clinometer and measured the heights of trees. Over 300 children and parents attended the event.  >>

04/20/2007
GLOBE @ NSTA - St. Louis, MO 2007
GLOBE had a strong presence at the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) annual conference 28 - 31 March 2007. Major activities included NSTA International Science Education Day, the GLOBE North America Regional Meeting, GLOBE representation in the NASA and UCAR Booths, the annual GLOBE Community Reception and many presentations by the GLOBE community.  >>

03/01/2007
City Officials in Charleston, Arkansas Look to GLOBE Student Data to Alleviate the Impacts of Recent Water Shortages
In Charleston, Arkansas, there have been ongoing drought conditions for the past several years. Unfortunately, city planners did not have the data needed to address the drought situation. Gloria Eiland, a teacher at Charleston Elementary wrote, "As our city water supply fell to an all- time low, the community started asking questions that only the GLOBE students could answer."  >>