Community Blogs
 

Included below is a feed of the latest blog posts created by the GLOBE Community. To view a tutorial on how you can create a blog click here 



Check out the latest and greatest images, from NASA, associated with the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) event. These images that you will see show sea surface height anomalies with the seasonal cycle (the effects of summer, fall, winter, and spring) removed. The differences between what we see and what is normal for different times and regions are called anomalies, or residuals. When oceanographers and climatologists view these "anomalies" they can identify unusual patterns and can tell us how heat is being stored in the ocean to influence future planetary climate events. Each...


Posted in: Field Campaigns: El Niño

US La Nina forecast: Snowy winter on tap for East; Dry weather to alleviate flood woes in South Central! Check this out!


Posted in: Field Campaigns: El Niño

10. El Niño Student Campaign Refresher and Update -  Wednesday, September 21st, 2016 8:00 pm EDT (12:00 am September 22nd UTC) In this hour-long webinar, participants will get a refresher on this campaign, and will hear from several GLOBE teachers who have been involved with their classes from the start of the campaign. We will discuss the need for ongoing data collection and share the current state of the ENSO cycle.  We will have a NASA scientist discuss the current state of the ENSO cycle and what it might mean for weather conditions for the remainder of this campaign. ...


Posted in: Field Campaigns: El Niño Primary Audience: Alumni Country Coordinators Partners Scientists Students Teachers Trainers

A heat lamp and reflector socket with a spring clamp may be purchased on-line for as little as $26. The amount of time required to dry samples depends on many things including the wetness of the initial sample, the soil characteristics, the relative humidity, and the temperature to which the sample is heated. GLOBE protocols specify that samples are not to be heated above 105 o C. In using a heat lamp, the temperature to which the sample is heated depends on the wattage of the bulb and the distance between the heat lamp and the sample bag. I have tried drying a sample using this...


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Phenology: Community Storytelling in Action (This is a continuation of my blog about Rising Voices. Click  here  to see the first blog entry in this series.) "How healthy is our reef?" The following day, after meeting Aunty Pua Case and hearing about the sacredness of Mauna Kea and touring the Mauna Loa Observatory, we went to the Ka’upulehu Interpretive Center to learn about place-based learning in Hawai’i. There, we met Aunty Lei - another powerful educator and leader who talked about the educational center that they created in their community and some of the...


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Blog Two (This is a continuation of my blog about Rising Voices. Click here to see the first blog entry in this series.) Part One: Mauna Kea “Let’s do something that is right for our mountain, and our people, and our mountain.” Location: Pu’uhuluhul, base of the Mauna Kea Mountain, en route to Mauna Loa Observatory We arrived at the base between two mountains: Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa. We met Aunty Pua Case, who shared the importance of Mauna Kea to the people of Hawai’i and led us through a cultural protocol to recognize the sacredness of the space. Similar to ...


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Blog One: Rising Voices: Collaborative Science with Indigenous Knowledge for Climate Solutions Credit: Craig Elevitch     Nana ka maka, look with your eyes. Ho'olohe ka pepeiao, hear with your ears (not your Heart). Paa ka waha, shut your mouth. Hana i ka lima, work with your hands.         According to the United States National Climate Assessment 2014 , “c limate change threatens Native Peoples’ access to traditional foods and adequate water. Alaskan Native communities are increasingly exposed...


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El Niño Field Campaign members, teachers, students, and campaign team at the 20th GLOBE Annual Meeting in Estes Park, Colorado 16-21 July 2016! Keep up the awesome work!


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Hello again! Our GLOBE Technology Working Group is meeting again. This annual meeting is in Estes Park, CO. A great get together with members, students, trainers and country coordinators from around the world (GLOBE)! Here is a spherical panorama of our working group doing the important business of reviewing all our recent work, etc. GLOBE annual meeting (Estes Park, CO), Technology Working Group break out session. Discussing annual progress and challenges. - Spherical Image - RICOH THETA


Posted in: GLOBE Working Groups: Technology Working Group

See the latest and greatest satellite imagery of our current El Niño leading up to a potential La Niña! See more HERE!


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GLOBE friends, The Annual Meeting in Colorado is only a few days away! We -the members of the Evaluation Working Group- are really excited about having the opportunity to meet in person again and about having the chance to interact with all of you. Join us for our presentations to see what we have worked on for the past year. Our efforts will be much more targeted and much more effective if you share with us your experience of using GLOBE with your students. We would like to know your success stories, your challenges, your concerns and your suggestions.  At...


Posted in: GLOBE Working Groups: Evaluation Working Group

Have you ever wondered why you need to take so much data via the GLOBE Protocols? Are you part of the GLOBE El Niño Campaign. This articled entitled, "El Niño is over, and nearly all the forecasts got it wrong", really hits home with the idea that a global event like El Niño is so unpredictable. So many parts of the environment are being affected it is really hard to predict how each environment will respond to the changes an El Niño event can bring. Read the article HERE!


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If you clicked on a link to this page due to some intriguing headline, I hope you will not be too disappointed. A momentary lapse in judgement inspired me to ask the GLOBE Implementation Office (GIO) for a Blog tab and now that it is here; it’s been waiting for some content. My intent was to fill this with guest bloggers, U.S. teachers in particular, writing about how they are implementing GLOBE in their classrooms. There weren’t any volunteers. [sad face] Until I can entice a couple of GLOBE teachers, you get me, Jen Bourgeault. I have had the pleasure and honor of being the U.S....


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Guest Blogger: Pat Benner from Somerset County Schools, Maryland and her students.               Sixth grade students at Somerset Intermediate School on the Eastern Shore of Maryland are currently studying weather, climate, and human impacts on Earth systems, synthesizing our year-long study of Earth science. We monitored and measured weather conditions daily for five weeks as we researched and analyzed the factors that influence weather phenomena. After identifying trends and cause effect relationships, we graphed our...


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  The 2015-2016 El Niño Event  - Tuesday May 17th, 2016 8:00 pm EDT (12:00 am May 18th UTC) In this hour-long webinar,  Dr. William Patzert , a scientist at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, will share the current state of the 2015-2016 El Niño event, and will discuss whether this El Niño matched the predictions for how global weather patterns would be impacted. Participants will also learn how to use the GLOBE data visualization tools to compare and contrast the El Niño Student field campaign variables from schools around the world from  David Overoye...


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Bird Beaks and What they Eat Overview:  Students identify ideal beak shape for food. Age: Upper primary (4th and 5th graders) assisted 1st graders Materials: Bird beak/food handout Straws Dixie cups Juice Tweezers Bowls Wild grain rice Slotted spoons Cooked noodles (macaroni or similarly shaped) Chopsticks Gummy bears White rice Scissors Marshmallows (jumbo) Plan: Ask students why birds have beaks and what they are used for - allow time for discussion. Read a book about beaks to the group. I used ...


Posted in: Curriculum: Science and Math GLOBE Science Topics: General Science Learning Activities: Land Cover/Biology Primary Audience: Students Teachers

"The global weather pattern that has been affecting the United States over the last 9 months is coming to an end, and now its sister is likely to take hold." Check out this recent article - http://www.fox9.com/news/135728044-story  


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Click on the link forwarded by Dr.Tim Schmit (GOES-R PI) to view some amazing imagery! http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/ goes/blog/archives/category/goes-14


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  Everything went wrong yesterday. We couldn't bring up the teacher's equipment, the old fashioned thermometers were only props, my jetpack was too slow and then they had to leave, but I wanted to comment from a STEM/STEAM perspective, not a disappointment p.o.v. but from the mouths of my students working with big ideas for 4th graders. 1) They loved the cloud chart and had no idea that the atmosphere had highs and lows like the octaves we've been working towards. 2) They stopped confusing Arabic with Persian writing. (Arabic is one of the 6 UN languages that Globe uses.) ...


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The kids learned to assess a problem for solutions today when the Thermometer did work  Then the log in didn't work and they still told me where to go to resolve this. https://www.wunderground.com/us/ca/lake-balboa   °F Overcast Boston, MA 51.3 °F Partly Cloudy Houston, TX 84.8 °F Partly Cloudy San Francisco, CA 70.5 °F Partly Cloudy   Lake Balboa, CA 3:43 PM PDT on April 20, 2016 (GMT -0700) South Northridge | Report | Change Station Report Station You are about to report this weather station for bad data. Please...


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Looking for collaborators on the GOES-R Weather Watchers Project. Let's bring the satellite and STEM education community together!


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Berks Nature is the new Northeast Mid-Atlantic regional partner forum member. My name is Michael Griffith and my email address is michael.griffith@berksnature.org. If you have any question please feel free to contact me. My main background is water, birds, and bugs, but I am familiar with all the protocols. We are here to help you with education in anyway possible. All my contact information is below.     Work Bio  Michael J. Griffith Education & Watershed Specialist Michael joined our staff in August of 2015. He has volunteered for many environmental...


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This is the second half to a blog posted on 25 March 2016. To see part one, click here . We are pleased that our guest blogger, Jacob Spivey, is back to share more information about oceans and climate. Jacob also blogs at Weatherbolt .  If part of the ocean has a lower salinity, then it’s going to be less dense and there won’t be as much sinking water there. This can trigger the slowdown of another circulation, the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation, or AMOC (thank goodness scientists abbreviate some of the names that they come up with!). Like the GTC, this is another...


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Our swim off the shore of the Antarctic continent was coined as the “polar plunge.”  Plunge is a verb meaning “to jump quickly and energetically.”  I did just that – the quicker I got in, the sooner I could get right back out!  I plunged holding a bucket to collect the day’s water sample from Neko Harbor.  Since I had jumped into the Arctic’s water last June ( read here ), I was confident I could do this.  I knew just what to expect:  frigid water cold enough to feel like a million needles.  Probably overconfident from the excitement, the...


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The third and fourth grade students whom I work with at Cedar Grove ES asked me what will happen once the El Nino conditions begin to subside, and I admitted that I really wasn't sure. So, we used the internet and looked it up! We found a website that answered our question!  Discovery News has a great article with videos and graphics at  http://news.discovery.com/earth/weather-extreme-events/will-la-nina-follow-one-of-the-strongest-ever-el-ninos-160410.htm .  This article suggests that this strong El Nino season may be followed by a La Nina event. Like all good...


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Dorian Janney, GLOBE Scientist Mentor Blog for El Nino Field Campaign   I have had the pleasure of working with two groups of elementary school students this year as their GLOBE mentor. They attend Cedar Grove Elementary School in Clarksburg, MD. My primary goal was to install an instrument box with a rain gauge and a multi-day thermometer at their school, and to help them collect and report data to GLOBE.  Here they are collecting data:   As we observed the weather patterns, they began to ask what the difference was between weather and climate. I gave...


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Water Availability can be defined as "The hydrologic capacity of a water source (surface water body, groundwater, municipal water) to sustain additional water demands after considering other current water uses and water conditions. (GEMI, 2012) The Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission provides information on water availability and environmental stress for estimating plant productivity and potential yield. The availability of direct observations of soil moisture status and the timing and extent of potential frost damage from SMAP enables significant improvements in operational crop...


Posted in: Field Campaigns: SMAP Primary Audience: Alumni Country Coordinators Partners Scientists Students Teachers Trainers

Penguins have the right of way at land and sea!  The first thing I noticed when we landed at Peterman Island (off the west coast of the Antarctic Peninsula) was long sled tracks down the hillside.      As I walked to take a closer look, I had to wait for a fearless gentoo penguin to cross the path in front of me, since penguins have the right of way!         Winter childhood memories of sledding with my brothers in Ohio, USA flooded my heart when I then saw several penguins tobogganing, sliding down...


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In the midst of a very up and down El Niño season, have you ever wondered: are all El Niños the same? For the answer to that question, we need to compare data imagery from two separate El Niño events. And what better way to do that then with global observations from space. One place to find what we’re looking for is the Center for Climate Sciences, El Niño page. http://climatesciences.jpl.nasa.gov/enso Here scientists compare multiple datasets from the largest El Niño on record, 1997-1998, with the current 2015-2016 El Niño season. Some of the datasets show what are called...


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What do students in Lima Peru and Ida Michigan have in common? The answer is quite simple, the dramatic effects of this year’s El Niño. Thanks in part to The GLOBE Program’s worldwide reach in connecting schools with one another; mentorship from Dr. Kevin Czajkowski from the University of Toledo and the inquisitive nature of students from Ida Middle School. Students from Mrs. Lanna Harmon’s 6 th grade class of Ida Middle School in Ida Michigan reached out to work with students from ESD Coordinator Mrs. Milagros Gallegos’s 7 th grade ESD Club from Colegio Altair School in Lima, Peru....


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Our zodiac landed on a flat volcanic beach to an unexpected sight.   Gentoo penguins and Antarctic fur seals were everywhere!                  The abandoned buildings proved we were not the first people these animals shared a beach with.  Dozens of seals and penguins seemed unaware of the law, the Antarctic Treaty, to keep a minimum of 5 meters from humans.         I was first introduced to the International Antarctic Treaty when I asked my...


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Not all raindrops are created equal. The size of falling raindrops depends on several factors, including where the cloud producing the drops is located on the globe and where the drops originate in the cloud. For the first time, scientists have three-dimensional snapshots of raindrops and snowflakes around the world from space, thanks to the joint NASA and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission. With the new global data on raindrop and snowflake sizes this mission provides, scientists can improve rainfall estimates from satellite data and in...


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  Volcanoes, a steamy lagoon, abandoned buildings, abundant wildlife: my first sight of Antarctica. This is a deception of my prediction of Antarctica, which is quite fitting for the name of our first landing:  Deception Island.    The first documented people, sealers in the 1800’s, were deceived as they sailed through the entrance point, Neptune’s Bellow.  They thought they’d reach open sea, but were instead encased in this horseshoe-shaped island.    The very first Antarctic fur seal sighting will stick in my mind forever. ...


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Tomorrow I will bridge to the LA Zoo at least by using their handouts with data capture on our campus. I am setting up by research teams by tables by teacher classroom.  They love their recorders and soon will add taking the room temperature into their own research area collected by investigative team/table 1-5.  They will be exploring predictions, measurements, fractions, parts, wholes and sums or averages, maps, map making and breathing like the lungs of the planet while we learn words like canopy, bionome, humus, serpentine to describe maps and reading symbols, signs, and...


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The freezing and thawing of our planet's soil can make a big impact on our climate. Check out the blog below to see just how important this is. SMAP’s focus also includes measurements of freeze/thaw, which tells us whether the land surface is frozen or thawed in areas north of 45-degree north latitude. This is very important to know, because when the vegetation is frozen there is minimal exchange of gasses (CO2 primarily) between the vegetation and the atmosphere. It’s as if the vegetation were in a state of hibernation. This changes however, when spring begins and temperature rises...


Posted in: Field Campaigns: SMAP Primary Audience: Alumni Country Coordinators Partners Scientists Students Teachers Trainers

Greetings from Ushuaia, Argentina South America - the southernmost city on our amazing planet!  Hello, I’m Laura Schetter a GLOBE teacher, from Holland, Ohio, USA.  This city is the site we will embark on the Ocean Endeavor ship to reach Antarctica.  From the west coast of the Antarctic Peninsula, I will be collecting hydrosphere and atmospheric data for GLOBE.  Additionally, I will enter “water stories”  - accounts of interactions with water for the H2you Project (h2youproject.com).  This International Antarctic Expedition is with Robert Swan and his 2041...


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We are just about one month into the El Niño Field Campaign and we have many schools that have gone above and beyond expectations. Teacher, Jeff Bouwman, at Shumate Middle School in Michigan, has taken his student science to the next level. By maximizing his classroom space to using the great outdoors to do great science, #GettingScienceDone is setting the bar high for student GLOBE measurements. Students from the Medford Memorial Middle School in New Jersey, and teacher, Vicky Gorman, have been collecting samples well before the campaign began. From getting their hands dirty in...


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We are pleased to welcome guest blogger Jacob Spivey. Jacob is a senior undergraduate in Meteorology with a minor in Climatology at Penn State University. Fascinated by weather extremes as he was growing up, today he looks at possible relationships between extreme weather and climate change. Within the past few years, he has also begun looking at how these subjects are communicated to the general public, a process which he has started doing himself in his online blog,  Weatherbolt . Ask someone what they think of when they hear about climate change, and you might get a...


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"The Atlanta Science Festival is an annual public celebration of local science and technology. From March 19-26, 2016, curious people of all ages will explore the science and technology in our region and see how science is connected to all parts of our lives in 100 engaging events, including hands-on activities, facility tours, presentations, and performances throughout the metro Atlanta region." --- http://atlantasciencefestival.org/ On Saturday, March 19, there was a GLOBE/SMAP Training Workshops at the Captain Planet Foundation. Participants learned how to take soil...


Posted in: Field Campaigns: SMAP Primary Audience: Alumni Country Coordinators Partners Scientists Students Teachers Trainers

Want to hear about this in their own words? Watch the recording of  Webinar #3


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Dramatic images show El Niño beginning to rescue California from its drought! As you may know, the state of California has been facing drought conditions for some time now. Over the last few months, the El Niño phenomenon has brought much needed precipitation to the drought-stricken state. Click HERE to read the full story and see the evidential images.


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The SMAP Mission satellite launched on 31-January 2015 from the Vandenberg Air Force Base in California.  Check out the video below to watch it take off!  


Posted in: Field Campaigns: SMAP Primary Audience: Alumni Country Coordinators Partners Scientists Students Teachers Trainers

Check out how CNES and NASA scientists are using GLOBE protocols to study El Niño During the Fall 2015 American Geophysical Union (AGU) conference, scientist from Centre National D’Etudes Spatial (CNES) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) came together to present findings on how CNES and NASA are using GLOBE protocols to study El Niño. GLOBE partner and CNES scientist Danielle DeStaerke and NASA scientist Margaret Srinivasan used the Atmosphere/Climate, Hydrology, Land Cover/Biology and Phenology protocols to study impacts of El Niño. Finding more about...


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How do SMAP Scientists Use GLOBE Data (Part II)? Data Analysis and Blog by Dr. Erika Podest, SMAP Scientist In order to start using GLOBE soil moisture data we need at least 15 measurements collected on days when SMAP flew overhead. The Varazdin School is an example of such and the chart below is a comparison between their data and SMAP soil moisture at 36 km 2 spatial resolution. Figure 2: Comparison between SMAP and GLOBE soil moisture from Varazdin school in Croatia. There are several things to note in Fig. 2. First, GLOBE measurements collected early on did not...


Posted in: Field Campaigns: SMAP Primary Audience: Alumni Country Coordinators Partners Scientists Students Teachers Trainers

How do SMAP Scientists Use GLOBE Data (Part I)? Data Analysis and Blog by Dr. Erika Podest, SMAP Scientist SMAP has been collecting soil moisture measurements since mid-April 2015, which are freely available, online through the National Snow and Ice Data Archive Center (NSIDC): https://nsidc.org/data/smap Of utmost importance is to have an assessment of the quality of the data, which is why there is a SMAP calibration/validation group. Its purpose is to determine the accuracy of the measurements and whether there are any biases. In order to calibrate and validate the SMAP...


Posted in: Field Campaigns: SMAP Investigation Areas: Pedosphere (Soil) » Soil Moisture - SMAP Block Pattern Primary Audience: Alumni Country Coordinators Partners Scientists Students Teachers Trainers

While your students continue to collect data for the El Niño Field Campaign, think about how you can have your students interpret the data they are collecting and expand upon its use. From science fair projects to student research projects to El Niño (ENSO) Tales & Stories (see below for more details), your students can come up with great ways to use the data they are collecting to tell a story of how El Niño is affecting local environments to having global impacts. Below is the El Niño Field Campaign Student Scaffold. This is the step-by-step process envisioned by the El Niño Team...


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Fenómeno El Niño: 8 niños mueren en Piura por altas temperaturas El Niño : 8 children die in Peru by high temperatures It seems the effects of the El Niño phenomena has cause the death of eight children due to heat stroke.  Click HERE to see the original story, in Spanish. Below is the entire article translated into English. _________________ The high temperatures in northern Peru due to El Niño have killed at least eight children as a result of heat stroke, the regional director of Health of the Piura region, Jesus Juarez said. Speaking to Canal N. Juarez said...


Posted in: Primary Audience: Alumni Country Coordinators Partners Scientists Students Teachers Trainers

Check out this diagram from the NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information, showing some of the interesting anomalies and events for January 2016. If you visit their website , you can look at similar charts for other recent months, or annual summaries such as the one below, for 2015.


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Did you know that soil moisture plays a vital role in human health? Those nasty little critters called mosquitoes love warm, wet soil, and can carry extremely dangerous viruses and diseases. We also can use SMAP soil moisture data to assist famine early warning systems. Improved seasonal soil moisture forecasts using SMAP data will directly benefit famine early warning systems particularly in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia, where hunger remains a major human health factor and the population harvests its food from rain-fed agriculture in highly monsoonal (seasonal) conditions. In...


Posted in: Field Campaigns: SMAP Investigation Areas: Pedosphere (Soil) Pedosphere (Soil) » Soil Moisture - SMAP Block Pattern Primary Audience: Alumni Country Coordinators Partners Scientists Students Teachers Trainers

See  https://www.facebook.com/groups/602168936587444/  


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