Blogs

Entries with Investigation Areas Hydrosphere .

This week’s blog post comes to us from Dr. Janis Steele and Dr. Brooks McCutchen. Drs. Steele and McCutchen, along with their three sons, have been aboard Research Vessel Llyr since April 24, 2013. Read about their adventure in the Intertropical Convergence Zone here. When people think of life in the seas, it is often the majestic that comes to mind, such aswhales, sharks, rays and coral...


Posted in: GLOBE Science Topics: General Science Earth as a System Investigation Areas: Hydrosphere

Blog originally posted on The GLOBE Scientists' Blog: http://blog.globe.gov/sciblog/2013/03/13/from-lake-superior-to-the-mississippi-river-a-renewed-commitment-to-fresh-water/ This week we are beginning our Full Length Mississippi series, and we will team back up with Mike Link and Kate Crawley.  Link and Crawley highlighted pieces of their Full Circle Superior journey with the...


Posted in: Field Campaigns: Watersheds GLOBE Science Topics: Earth as a System Investigation Areas: Hydrosphere

Nitrogen is an important molecule that makes up nearly 78 percent of the atmosphere.  Burning fossil fuels and using fertilizers for agriculture are two ways that this number can increase.  But the atmosphere isn’t the only place that nitrogen is found – it is also found in bodies of water.  Of the nitrogen that is spread in fertilizers, only 25-30 percent is absorbed by...


Posted in: GLOBE Science Topics: Climate Change Climate Investigation Areas: Hydrosphere Hydrosphere » Nitrates

Sometimes in a rapidly changing world, it is difficult to see the effects that small changes in human lifestyle can have on not only climate, but on ecosystems.  Various countries and international organizations are working to pass legislation to ensure change.  One such case of legislation working is being observed in the San Francisco Bay – the return of harbor porpoises....


Posted in: GLOBE Science Topics: General Science Backyard Science GLOBE Protocols Investigation Areas: Hydrosphere

Late last week, Pacific Ocean visitors near San Diego, California, USA were able to see an amazing sight that doesn’t happen very often… glowing waves! So what exactly is the process that causes the glowing waves? Algae!  This particular type of algae, Lingulodinium polyedrum, began blooming in late August.  During the day, the waters off the coast of California turn a brownish-red...


Posted in: GLOBE Science Topics: Backyard Science Investigation Areas: Hydrosphere