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One of the most important parts of the scientific process is communicating results, and a major aspect of that is displaying the data. Often, that means some sort of graph. However, it’s not always easy to decide which type of graph to use to best convey the message you want it to. Graphs should tell the story of the data, and it takes attention to the type of graph as well as formatting and style choices to ensure that the story is told well. You may need to try different graphs displaying the same data before you figure out the most effective way to communicate your story. Here are a...


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Most cloud observations, including those using the GLOBE Observer app and even many from satellites, focus on the surface of clouds. It’s also useful, however, to be able to look inside clouds, especially storm clouds, to be able to get a picture of what’s going on now, and what might happen next. As an example, let’s look at Hurricane Joaquin, which was over the Caribbean in late September 2015. First, some ground observations from GLOBE overlaid on satellite surface reflectance data (below). On September 29th, the closest data point to the storm (center of image) is from Ramey...


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Not all raindrops are created equal. The size of falling raindrops depends on several factors, including where the cloud producing the drops is located on the globe and where the drops originate in the cloud. For the first time, scientists have three-dimensional snapshots of raindrops and snowflakes around the world from space, thanks to the joint NASA and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission. With the new global data on raindrop and snowflake sizes this mission provides, scientists can improve rainfall estimates from satellite data and in...


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Check out this diagram from the NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information, showing some of the interesting anomalies and events for January 2016. If you visit their website , you can look at similar charts for other recent months, or annual summaries such as the one below, for 2015.


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By Kristen Weaver, posted 12/4/15 2:33 PM

GPM's ground validation campaign called OLYMPEX is in full swing! (See my earlier blog post for more background about the campaign.) You can visit the OLYMPEX website to see daily precipitation data, like this image below: If you go to the website itself, you can click on any of the points to get more detailed information about that station, see the latest satellite and  coastal radar images, and read science summaries . For a quicker overview, here are two videos about the campaign. One produced by NASA: And one produced by the Weather Channel: ...


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