Community Blogs

Community Blogs
 

Included below is a feed of the latest blog posts created by the GLOBE Community. To view a tutorial on how you can create a blog click here 

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      Left: SEES Mosquito Mapper intern Maia W. in the field, sampling a mosquito larvae habitat on a construction site in her hometown. Right: GLOBE Observer Land Cover observations collected alongside mosquito habitat identifications provide important data for analysis. Photo credit: Author. As part of our field research, SEES interns identify local potential mosquito breeding habitats. As I live in an area that is cold and rainy most of the year, I did not anticipate finding any larvae, and when I did find some, it was not in the area I expected. Rather than...


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#19 August 2019 Prepared by Helen Amos, helen.m.amos@nasa.gov   How to Download Dust Observations Reported through GLOBE Dust event on 10 July 2019. Photo credit: GLOBE                             Citizen scientists from around the world have been reporting dust events using the NASA GLOBE Observer app. You can learn about how to get involved here. This blog offers step-by-step instructions on how to download GLOBE dust observations. There are two options. Option 1 is to download...


Posted in: Curriculum: STEM Science and Math Technology Event Topics: Campaigns and Projects (IOPs, etc) GLOBE Science Topics: Earth System Science General Science Data Included Backyard Science Climate Scientist Skills GLOBE Protocols GLOBE Working Groups: Education Working Group Science Working Group Investigation Areas: Atmosphere Earth As a System Learning Activities: Earth as a System Atmosphere and Climate News Topics: Training Competitions Primary Audience: Partners Scientists Alumni Country Coordinators Trainers Teachers Students Teacher's Guide: Investigation Area Documents

SEES Mosquito Mapper intern Lindsay W. in the field, sampling a mosquito larvae habitat site in her study area. Photo credit: Author. California has recently emerged from a multi-year drought, but I live at the edge of a town in the chaparral where water is typically scarce. I often travel miles by car to find potential mosquito habitats, only to find no larvae in those water sources. I eventually contacted Vector Control in hopes that they could direct me to potential breeding sites, and they sent me a few locations. As of yet, most sites I’ve visited have had water and no mosquitoes....


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       Left: example larva of the genus Toxorhynchites recovered from one of the author's research traps. Right: Larval specimen of prey, Culex quinquefasciatus, for comparison. Toxorhynchites are predator larvae  and easily recognized by their unique morphology and larger size. Photo credit: Author. Toxorhynchites is part of the mosquito family (Culicidae), also known as the “elephant mosquito” and “mosquito eater” and for good reason!  These formidable larvae use their mandibles to prey on the larvae of other mosquitoes inhabiting the same...


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SEES Mosquito Mapper intern Parker L. in his lab, identifying a specimen recovered from one of his mosquito research traps. Photo credit: Author. I am fascinated at how effectively Aedes albopictus has expanded beyond its historical geographical origins in Asia, sticking its proboscis into Texas along with every continent across the globe except Antarctica.  This invasive mosquito, which serves as a vector for dengue and chikungunya, has been enormously successful in utilizing alternative breeding containers to supplement its natural oviposition sites.  In fact, it is...


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