STEM Network Blog Intro

STEM Professionals' Blog


The GLOBE International STEM professionals Network (GISN) Blog is an online collaborative effort where scientists associated with GLOBE post their thoughts, comments, and philosophies about a variety of science topics.

GLOBE strongly encourages positive and productive discussions to further advance the scientific understanding of all involved with The GLOBE Program.

Scientist Blogs Aggregator




Each cloud observation submitted using the GLOBE Observer app or through The GLOBE Program is compared to data from multiple satellites. A satellite match is when satellite data is identified that corresponds to a cloud observation. For orbiting satellites the observation must be within 15 minutes before or after a satellite’s overpass. Geostationary satellites, like the GOES satellites, are always observing the same location. If you are in the United States, you are likely  to get a satellite match to a GOES satellite. These satellites are sending data every 15 minutes. As long as the...


Posted in: Curriculum: Science and Math STEM GLOBE Science Topics: Backyard Science Climate General Science GLOBE Protocols Earth as a System Earth System Science Scientist Skills Investigation Areas: Atmosphere Earth As a System News Topics: Community Letters News Briefs Primary Audience: Alumni Country Coordinators Partners Scientists Students Teachers Trainers

The NASA GLOBE Clouds team at NASA Langley Research Center is working with NASA scientist Dr. Bill Smith to use GLOBE Cloud observations made by people just like you to solve the Terminator Problem! Wait, what? Well, the Solar Terminator or twilight zone is that line that separates the daylit side of a planet from the dark night side. The image on the left is an example. It was taken from the International Space Station as it crossed the terminator on April 17, 2019 as it orbits 254 miles above the Gulf of Guinea on Africa’s mid-western coast.      How can you...


Posted in: Curriculum: Education Research Science and Math Technology STEM GLOBE Science Topics: Backyard Science Climate Climate Change Data Included General Science GLOBE Protocols Earth as a System Earth System Science Scientist Skills Investigation Areas: Atmosphere Earth As a System Learning Activities: Atmosphere and Climate Earth as a System News Topics: Community Letters News Briefs Student Research Reports: Standard Research Report International Virtual Science Symposium Report U.S. Student Research Symposia (SRS)

In May 2020, citizen scientist Carmen Mandel met two major milestones: she marked her one-year anniversary of being a GLOBE Observer and she single-handedly expanded the Clouds satellite match data by 36%. Carmen uses GLOBE Observer to record clouds 2-3 times daily every time she gets a notification that a NASA satellite is overhead. She sends her data to GLOBE, but then she records her observation in her own clouds journal. When she receives an email from NASA Langley Research Center matching her observation to satellite data, she adds that to her journal as well. On...


Posted in: GLOBE Science Topics: Backyard Science Data Included Earth System Science General Science Investigation Areas: Atmosphere Atmosphere » Clouds Primary Audience: Alumni Country Coordinators Scientists Students

Have you ever wondered what happens after you press submit on your International Virtual Science Symposium (IVSS) report? The GLOBE Implementation Office (GIO) Education team gets to work! Ok, that might be a little misleading because work on the IVSS already started back in August when we started planning for the 2021 IVSS. And while learning about planning webinars and recruiting judges might be something you are interested in; this is not what this blog post will cover. This is the “story” of what happens after teachers upload their students’ projects and press the big blue SUBMIT...


Posted in: News Topics: Virtual Science Fair Primary Audience: Alumni Country Coordinators Partners Scientists Students Teachers Trainers Student Research Reports: International Virtual Science Symposium Report

Images taken by Wilson Bentley and property of the Jericho Historical Society.  Did you know that clouds have names? As the title of the GLOBE Elementary book says, clouds do have names. Those names describe the altitude and the appearance of the cloud. Cumulus means pile in Latin, so the name is used to describe low puffy clouds in the sky. Cirrus means locks of hair, and is used to describe those thin wispy clouds found high up in the sky. Some people think that nimbus is a type of cloud, but it is not. It is an affix, or a word that works as a prefix or a suffix. The affix nimbus...


Posted in: Curriculum: Assessment and Evaluation GLOBE Science Topics: Backyard Science Investigation Areas: Atmosphere Learning Activities: Atmosphere and Climate News Topics: Community Letters Primary Audience: Alumni