STEM Network Blog Intro

STEM Professionals' Blog


The GLOBE International STEM professionals Network (GISN) Blog is an online collaborative effort where scientists associated with GLOBE post their thoughts, comments, and philosophies about a variety of science topics.

GLOBE strongly encourages positive and productive discussions to further advance the scientific understanding of all involved with The GLOBE Program.

Scientist Blogs Aggregator




Data Data Everywhere! #1: How to get the 'T' out! You may have noticed that the time format when you retrieve data from the GLOBE web site recently changed. The new format is YYYY-MM-DDTHH:MM:SS.   We would like to show a quick and easy way to go back to the time format MM/DD/YYYY HH:MM:SS. 1) Select the column that has the time format you want to change. 2) Copy the column to a new location on your spreadsheet; you do not want to manipulate the original column directly, to avoid losing data. 3) Make sure there is a blank column next to the column that you...


Posted in: Investigation Areas: Atmosphere » Aerosols

GLOBE Students! The GLOBE Clouds team is hoping you are all collecting observations or downloading and analyzing clouds data for the upcoming U.S. Student Research Symposia or the International Virtual Science Symposium. If you are using data downloaded from the GLOBE site, you will see a T between the date and time of the observations (example - 2018-10-01T14:00:00).    We got together with Dr. Helen Amos, who put together steps on how to take the "T" out using Excel and Google sheets. The result is having a date and time that looks like 2018-04-13T16:27:00 UTC to...


Posted in: Event Topics: Campaigns and Projects (IOPs, etc) Competitions Science Symposia and Fairs GLOBE Science Topics: Scientist Skills Meetings/Conferences GLOBE Protocols Investigation Areas: Atmosphere Learning Activities: Atmosphere and Climate News Topics: Virtual Science Fair Regions Student Research Reports: U.S. Student Research Symposia (SRS) International Virtual Science Symposium Report Standard Research Report

We’ve discussed how the mosquito story is a climate story and a human story, looking at climate history and human history. Contemporary climate change is now playing a role in the expansion of vector borne disease- not only in space but also in time. How many days are mosquitoes active in your city? You can find out by using this Disease Danger Day tool:  http://www.climatecentral.org/news/us-faces-a-rise-in-mosquito-disease-danger-days-21903. I live in Colorado, so I selected Denver, and found out that since 1970 there are now 10 more days a year on average when mosquitoes are...


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The NASA GLOBE Clouds team is looking for members of the GLOBE International STEM Network (GISN) or any researcher that would be interested in publishing research (as lead or co-author) using the GLOBE Clouds data.  We are looking for researchers that are interested in: Cryosphere that would be willing to use cloud observations over the Arctic/Antarctica. Satellite validation studies with collocated observations, particularly those collected during GLOBE Clouds Data Challenge (March 15-April 15, 2018). Natural hazards to explore possibilities of using the...


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The NASA GLOBE Clouds team is looking for members of the GLOBE International STEM Network (GISN) or any researcher that would be interested in publishing research (as lead or co-author) using the GLOBE Clouds data.  We are looking for researchers that are interested in: Cryosphere that would be willing to use cloud observations over the Arctic/Antarctica. Satellite validation studies with collocated observations, particularly those collected during GLOBE Clouds Data Challenge (March 15-April 15, 2018). Natural hazards to explore possibilities of using the...


Posted in: Event Topics: Other GLOBE Science Topics: Climate Change Data Included Earth System Science Backyard Science Climate GLOBE Protocols GLOBE Working Groups: Science Working Group Primary Audience: Scientists

NOTICE: REAL-TIME data on HoloGLOBE is unavailable at this time due to a lapse in appropriation as a result of the U.S. government shutdown. More info at :https://governmentshutdown.noaa.gov/


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The Urban Heat Island Effect Campaign in October was the best start to the campaign that GLOBE has ever had. 89 schools entered surface temperature data. Some schools like Huntington High School in West Virginia entered a lot of observations. Thanks Mr. Sharpe. A list of the number of observations each school took are listed below. Now that so many observations have been taken, students can do research using the data. There are lots of research questions that students can ask and then answer with this data. The students in my Weather and Climate class are looking at various questions...


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  The 2019 GLOBE International Virtual Science Symposium important dates and rubrics are now available! The GLOBE Clouds team at NASA Langley Research Center would love to see you use cloud observations in your research!  Do you need some ideas? Here are a few. Also, don't forget about the blog on how to come up with a good research question.  K-2nd grade: - What is the cloud type observed the most during Fall/Spring/Summer (choose one or a different period of time)? - Which cloud type, nimbostratus or cumulonimbus, produces the most rain at our school? (choose a...


Posted in: Curriculum: STEM Education Research Science and Math Technology Event Topics: Science Symposia and Fairs GLOBE Science Topics: Earth System Science GLOBE Protocols General Science Backyard Science Climate Primary Audience: Trainers Teachers Students Partners Scientists Alumni Country Coordinators

CloudSat and CALIPSO were designed to complement each other in the 1990s. They launched together on the same rocket in 2006. Then they spent more than 10 years orbiting Earth in formation with a coterie of other satellites in what's known as the A-Train, or afternoon constellation.  Flying together enables the A Train satellites to gather diverse measurements of the Earth below at nearly the same time as they circle the globe pole-to-pole, crossing the equator around 1:30 p.m. local time every day. The nearly simultaneous observations allow scientists to build a more sophisticated...


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Our mosquito story is a climate story. In the Early Holocene around 8200 years ago, the area that is today the Sahara Desert was much wetter and supported grassland vegetation. During the mid-Holocene, about 5000 years ago, changes in the monsoon began to dry out much of north Africa. This caused the Sahara to expand, and the yellow fever mosquito (Aedes aegypti) was forced to retreat to areas where they could still find standing water to breed. These were also the same places where humans migrated, congregated and settled. A changing climate brought people and mosquitoes together, and the...


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