STEM Network Blog Intro

STEM Professionals' Blog


The GLOBE International STEM professionals Network (GISN) Blog is an online collaborative effort where scientists associated with GLOBE post their thoughts, comments, and philosophies about a variety of science topics.

GLOBE strongly encourages positive and productive discussions to further advance the scientific understanding of all involved with The GLOBE Program.

Scientist Blogs Aggregator




  ¿Vives en un área que tiene tormentas de polvo atmosférico? Nos gustaría que fotografíes el evento y envíes tus fotos usando el app GLOBE Observer. ¿Ya has estado enviando datos sobre tormentas de polvo atmosférico? ¡MUCHAS GRACIAS! Ahora queremos que todos sepan que pueden enviar datos sobre estas tormentas con GLOBE Observer usando los siguientes pasos.   Conoce a los científicos Daniel Tong es un pronosticador de polvo atmosférico con el Programa Nacional de Capacidades de Pronóstico de Calidad del Aire de la NOAA y el Equipo de Ciencias Aplicadas de Salud y...


Posted in: Curriculum: STEM Education Research Science and Math Event Topics: Campaigns and Projects (IOPs, etc) GLOBE Science Topics: Earth System Science General Science General Science @es Data Included Climate Earth as a System Scientist Skills GLOBE Protocols GLOBE Working Groups: Education Working Group Technology Working Group Science Working Group Investigation Areas: Atmosphere Earth As a System Learning Activities: Atmosphere and Climate News Topics: Regions Primary Audience: Partners Scientists Alumni Country Coordinators Trainers Teachers Students Teacher's Guide: Investigation Area Documents

      Left: SEES Mosquito Mapper intern Maia W. in the field, sampling a mosquito larvae habitat on a construction site in her hometown. Right: GLOBE Observer Land Cover observations collected alongside mosquito habitat identifications provide important data for analysis. Photo credit: Author. As part of our field research, SEES interns identify local potential mosquito breeding habitats. As I live in an area that is cold and rainy most of the year, I did not anticipate finding any larvae, and when I did find some, it was not in the area I expected. Rather than...


Posted in:

#19 August 2019 Prepared by Helen Amos, helen.m.amos@nasa.gov   How to Download Dust Observations Reported through GLOBE Dust event on 10 July 2019. Photo credit: GLOBE                             Citizen scientists from around the world have been reporting dust events using the NASA GLOBE Observer app. You can learn about how to get involved here. This blog offers step-by-step instructions on how to download GLOBE dust observations. There are two options. Option 1 is to download...


Posted in: Curriculum: STEM Science and Math Technology Event Topics: Campaigns and Projects (IOPs, etc) GLOBE Science Topics: Earth System Science General Science Data Included Backyard Science Climate Scientist Skills GLOBE Protocols GLOBE Working Groups: Education Working Group Science Working Group Investigation Areas: Atmosphere Earth As a System Learning Activities: Earth as a System Atmosphere and Climate News Topics: Training Competitions Primary Audience: Partners Scientists Alumni Country Coordinators Trainers Teachers Students Teacher's Guide: Investigation Area Documents

SEES Mosquito Mapper intern Lindsay W. in the field, sampling a mosquito larvae habitat site in her study area. Photo credit: Author. California has recently emerged from a multi-year drought, but I live at the edge of a town in the chaparral where water is typically scarce. I often travel miles by car to find potential mosquito habitats, only to find no larvae in those water sources. I eventually contacted Vector Control in hopes that they could direct me to potential breeding sites, and they sent me a few locations. As of yet, most sites I’ve visited have had water and no mosquitoes....


Posted in:

       Left: example larva of the genus Toxorhynchites recovered from one of the author's research traps. Right: Larval specimen of prey, Culex quinquefasciatus, for comparison. Toxorhynchites are predator larvae  and easily recognized by their unique morphology and larger size. Photo credit: Author. Toxorhynchites is part of the mosquito family (Culicidae), also known as the “elephant mosquito” and “mosquito eater” and for good reason!  These formidable larvae use their mandibles to prey on the larvae of other mosquitoes inhabiting the same...


Posted in: