STEM Professionals' Blog


The GLOBE International STEM professionals Network (GISN) Blog is an online collaborative effort where scientists associated with GLOBE post their thoughts, comments, and philosophies about a variety of science topics.

GLOBE strongly encourages positive and productive discussions to further advance the scientific understanding of all involved with The GLOBE Program.




  ¿Vives en un área que tiene tormentas de polvo atmosférico? Nos gustaría que fotografíes el evento y envíes tus fotos usando el app GLOBE Observer. ¿Ya has estado enviando datos sobre tormentas de polvo atmosférico? ¡MUCHAS GRACIAS! Ahora queremos que todos sepan que pueden enviar datos sobre estas tormentas con GLOBE Observer usando los siguientes pasos.   Conoce a los científicos Daniel Tong es un pronosticador de polvo atmosférico con el Programa Nacional de Capacidades de Pronóstico de Calidad del Aire de la NOAA y el Equipo de Ciencias...


Posted in: Curriculum: Education Research Science and Math STEM Event Topics: Campaigns and Projects (IOPs, etc) GLOBE Science Topics: Climate Data Included General Science General Science @es GLOBE Protocols Earth as a System Earth System Science Scientist Skills GLOBE Working Groups: Science Working Group Education Working Group Technology Working Group Investigation Areas: Atmosphere Earth As a System Learning Activities: Atmosphere and Climate News Topics: Regions Primary Audience: Alumni Country Coordinators Partners Scientists Students Teachers Trainers Teacher's Guide: Investigation Area Documents

# 19 August 2019 Prepared by Helen Amos, helen.m.amos@nasa.gov   How to Download Dust Observations Reported through GLOBE Dust event on 10 July 2019. Photo credit: GLOBE                             Citizen scientists from around the world have been reporting dust events using the  NASA GLOBE Observer app . You can learn about  how to get involved  here. This blog offers step-by-step instructions on how to download GLOBE dust...


Posted in: Curriculum: Science and Math Technology STEM Event Topics: Campaigns and Projects (IOPs, etc) GLOBE Science Topics: Backyard Science Climate Data Included General Science GLOBE Protocols Earth System Science Scientist Skills GLOBE Working Groups: Science Working Group Education Working Group Investigation Areas: Atmosphere Earth As a System Learning Activities: Atmosphere and Climate Earth as a System News Topics: Competitions Training Primary Audience: Alumni Country Coordinators Partners Scientists Students Teachers Trainers Teacher's Guide: Investigation Area Documents

Do you live in an area that has dust storms? The Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment Program (GLOBE) team would like you to photograph dust events in your area and submit your photos using the  GLOBE Observer app .   Join NASA GLOBE Clouds Project Scientist, Marilé Colón Robles, to learn more about how to collect your observations and educational resources you can use with formal and informal audiences. Your observations will be used by scientists to verify satellite observations and see if their models have successfully predicted these...


Posted in: Curriculum: Education Research Science and Math Technology Event Topics: Campaigns and Projects (IOPs, etc) GLOBE Science Topics: Backyard Science Climate Climate Change Data Included General Science GLOBE Protocols Earth as a System Scientist Skills GLOBE Working Groups: Science Working Group Education Working Group Investigation Areas: Atmosphere Pedosphere (Soil) Learning Activities: Atmosphere and Climate Soil News Topics: Calendar Training Primary Audience: Alumni Country Coordinators Partners Scientists Students Teachers Trainers Teacher's Guide: Grade Level Investigation Area Documents

  Do you live in an  area that has dust storms?  We would like for you to photograph the dust event and submit your photos using the GLOBE Observer app. Have you already been reporting dust storms? We noticed and what to say THANK YOU! Now we want to get the word out that anyone can report dust storms with the app following the steps below.   Watch the recorded webinar on how to submit your observations using the NASA GLOBE Observer app and learn about educational resources you can use in your classroom or in an informal setting...


Posted in: Event Topics: Other GLOBE Science Topics: Climate General Science General Science @es GLOBE Protocols Earth as a System Scientist Skills GLOBE Working Groups: Science Working Group Education Working Group Technology Working Group News Topics: Calendar Regions Primary Audience: Alumni Country Coordinators Partners Scientists Students Teachers Trainers

The NASA GLOBE Clouds team is looking for members of the GLOBE International STEM Network (GISN) or any researcher that would be interested in publishing research (as lead or co-author) using the GLOBE Clouds data.  We are looking for researchers that are interested in: Cryosphere that would be willing to use cloud observations over the Arctic/Antarctica. Satellite validation studies with collocated observations, particularly those collected during GLOBE Clouds Data Challenge (March 15-April 15, 2018). Natural hazards to explore...


Posted in: Event Topics: Other GLOBE Science Topics: Backyard Science Climate Climate Change Data Included GLOBE Protocols Earth System Science GLOBE Working Groups: Science Working Group Primary Audience: Scientists

  The 2019 GLOBE International Virtual Science Symposium important dates and rubrics are now available! The GLOBE Clouds team at NASA Langley Research Center would love to see you use cloud observations in your research!  Do you need some ideas? Here are a few. Also, don't forget about the blog on how to come up with a good research question .  K-2nd grade: - What is the cloud type observed the most during Fall/Spring/Summer (choose one or a different period of time)? - Which cloud type, nimbostratus or cumulonimbus, produces the most...


Posted in: Curriculum: Education Research Science and Math Technology STEM Event Topics: Science Symposia and Fairs GLOBE Science Topics: Backyard Science Climate General Science GLOBE Protocols Earth System Science Primary Audience: Alumni Country Coordinators Partners Scientists Students Teachers Trainers

Clouds are amazing to observe and always seem to capture the attention of all, from little ones to the young at heart. The GLOBE Clouds team would like to help all of those that would be interested in doing research with clouds. A good research question is always tricky so here are some tips and ideas to get you started! What is a good research question? It is not always easy to come up with a research question, but GLOBE has a good checklist to help you out! You can even assign points and see how many points does your question total as a good research question. A...


Posted in: Curriculum: Education Research Science and Math STEM Event Topics: Campaigns and Projects (IOPs, etc) Science Symposia and Fairs GLOBE Science Topics: Backyard Science Climate Data Included General Science GLOBE Protocols Scientist Skills Investigation Areas: Atmosphere » Clouds Learning Activities: Atmosphere and Climate News Topics: Virtual Science Fair Primary Audience: Alumni Partners Students Teachers Trainers Teacher's Guide: Grade Level Investigation Area Documents

I just updated HoloGLOBE to v1.0.2. For those of you new to this app, HoloGLOBE brings NASA and NOAA visualizations of the Earth to the palm of your hand through augmented reality (AR). You can read more about the app here: http://www.palmyracove.org/InstituteforEarthObservations/HoloGLOBE.aspx In this latest release, I have added play/pause functionality to the MyNASAData module. The MyNASAData is essentially an augmented reality version of GLOBE's Earth System Poster. In addition the new ICESat-2 module has been added. The ICESat-2 module was built by Emme Wiederhold, a student...


Posted in: Curriculum: Assessment and Evaluation Education Research Language Culture and Arts Science and Math Technology STEM Event Topics: Campaigns and Projects (IOPs, etc) GLOBE Learning Expeditions Other Science Symposia and Fairs Competitions Meetings Workshops Field Campaigns: FLEXE SCRC SCUBAnauts Seasons and Biomes Watersheds Carbon Cycle GGIC SCRC - Phase 1 SCRC - Phase 2 SMAP El Niño Surface Temperature GPM GLOBE Science Topics: Backyard Science Climate Climate Change Data Included General Science General Science @es GLOBE Protocols Earth as a System Earth System Science Scientist Skills Meetings/Conferences GLOBE Working Groups: Evaluation Working Group Science Working Group Education Working Group Technology Working Group Investigation Areas: Atmosphere Hydrosphere Earth As a System Pedosphere (Soil) Biosphere Learning Activities: Atmosphere and Climate Earth as a System Hydrology Land Cover/Biology Soil News Topics: Competitions Meetings Video Web Maintenance / Enhancements Calendar IOPs Regions SCRC Research Training Virtual Science Fair Primary Audience: Alumni Country Coordinators Partners Scientists Students Teachers Trainers Teacher's Guide: Time Requirement Standards Requirement Grade Level Protocol Specific Documents Language Investigation Area Documents

Bill Smith, left, along with Kris Bedka. The NASA GLOBE Clouds team is excited to share with you this recent news article about two NASA scientists that help match your observations with satellite data - Bill Smith and Kris Bedka. They, along with Louis Nguyen lead SatCORPS, at team at NASA Langley Research Center that use expertise in clouds to make better weather predictions.  Read more about their work at  https://www.nasa.gov/feature/langley/how-cloud-data-is-improving-weather-forecasts    


Posted in: Curriculum: Science and Math Technology STEM Event Topics: Other GLOBE Science Topics: Climate General Science GLOBE Protocols Earth as a System Scientist Skills Investigation Areas: Atmosphere Primary Audience: Alumni Country Coordinators Partners Scientists Students Teachers Trainers

Satellites can detect and collect a lot of observations in very short amount of time. It is simple to think that anything that is white in an image is a cloud. Well, not always.  Look at these beautiful images taken by the GOES 16 satellite of the recent "Winter Weather Bomb" that left a blanket of snow from South Georgia to New England on January 4, 2018. Click here and watch a loop of images from the GOES 16 satellite for January 4, 2018. GOES 16 Image taken on January 4, 2018 at 171720Z GOES 16 Image taken on January 4, 2018 at 201720Z   ...


Posted in: Curriculum: Education Research STEM Event Topics: Other GLOBE Science Topics: Backyard Science Climate General Science GLOBE Protocols Scientist Skills Investigation Areas: Atmosphere » Clouds Learning Activities: Atmosphere and Climate Primary Audience: Partners Scientists Students Teachers Trainers

From the start, the measurement of daily maximum and minimum air temperature within one hour of local solar noon has been a key GLOBE protocol. The low cost approach was to use a U-tube thermometer housed in a wooden instrument shelter facing away from the equator. The U-shaped tube contained mercury with pins on either side of the mercury. As the air temperature warmed the pin on one side would move while the other pin stayed in place; when the air cooled, the pin on the other side would be pushed up. The pins were held in place by magnetized strips behind the thermometer tube so that...


Posted in: Curriculum: Technology STEM GLOBE Science Topics: Climate Climate Change GLOBE Protocols Earth as a System Earth System Science GLOBE Working Groups: Science Working Group Investigation Areas: Atmosphere Primary Audience: Alumni Country Coordinators Partners Scientists Students Teachers Trainers

As Earth science has a single uncontrolled object of study, the first rule is to take today’s data today. While ice and sediment cores and fossils can reveal past conditions, the observations that can be made right now cannot be replaced by ones taken later. This goes well with the Native American adage, “You can’t step in the same river twice.” The environment is constantly changing and doing so on a wide range of time and space scales. In a recent video post, Neil deGrasse Tyson said, “One of the great things about science is that it is an entire exercise finding what is true. You...


Posted in: Curriculum: Science and Math Event Topics: Campaigns and Projects (IOPs, etc) GLOBE Learning Expeditions Science Symposia and Fairs Field Campaigns: SMAP El Niño GLOBE Science Topics: Climate Climate Change General Science Earth as a System Earth System Science Investigation Areas: Earth As a System Primary Audience: Alumni Students Teachers

A version of this blog was originally posted on November 14, 2012 .  If you have been listening to the news or following along with weather and climate web pages, you have probably heard the term "ENSO."  ENSO, or El Niño-Southern Oscillation, is a quasi-periodic climate pattern that occurs in the tropical Pacific Ocean.  When the conditions change, the atmosphere responds in many different ways.  In certain locations, it is cloudier and it rains more, while in others it’s clear and dry.  Scientists are forecasting El Niño conditions to start...


Posted in: Curriculum: Science and Math GLOBE Science Topics: Climate Investigation Areas: Atmosphere

Blog originally posted on The GLOBE Scientists' Blog: http://blog.globe.gov/sciblog/2013/03/06/connecting-pollutants-and-air-temperature-in-the-maldives/ With climate change, there are many relationships that are understood, and many others that are not.  Dr. Veerabhadran Ramanathan from The Scripps Institute  in San Diego has spent the last fifteen years in the Maldives, a nation south of India that is comprised of over 1,200 islands, studying the relationship between air pollutants, cloud formation and air temperature. The Maldives are a great location for...


Posted in: Field Campaigns: Carbon Cycle GLOBE Science Topics: Climate Climate Change General Science Investigation Areas: Atmosphere

A couple of years ago, I attended a seminar sponsored by the Climate and Global Dynamics Division  (CGD) of the National Center for Atmospheric Research  (NCAR) on how climate change is threatening the survival of wolverines ( Gulo gulo ).  This scientist, Synte Peacock from CGD, painted a gloomy outlook for this ferocious creature after using a climate model to examine changes in spring snow cover and summer air temperatures.    However, recent legislative proposals may make the future a little brighter.   A...


Posted in: GLOBE Science Topics: Climate Climate Change

Blog originally posted on The GLOBE Scientists' Blog: http://blog.globe.gov/sciblog/2013/01/30/an-interesting-relationship-soil-temperature-and-climate-change/ It seems common place that warmer air temperature leads to warmer soil temperature. And while this relationship seems intuitive, the effect isn’t always studied, especially with respect to the response from microorganisms. That is why researchers are investigating what happens when the soil temperature increases. An intricate network of soil microorganisms From: Commonwealth Scientific and...


Posted in: GLOBE Science Topics: Climate Climate Change Investigation Areas: Pedosphere (Soil) » Soil Temperature

Blog originally posted on the GLOBE Scientists' Blog: http://blog.globe.gov/sciblog/2013/01/23/trees-in-trouble-what-affect-does-tree-mortality-have-on-climate-change/ Through our trees in trouble series, we’ve examined trees in the Sahel zone in Africa and the United States .  This problem, climate change and dying trees, has been seen on every continent, the only exception being Antarctica, due to the lack of vegetation on the frozen continent.   Scientists have recently found that there is an alarming loss rate of big, old trees, whose ages range from...


Posted in: GLOBE Science Topics: Climate Climate Change General Science Investigation Areas: Atmosphere Biosphere

Blog previously posted on The GLOBE Scientists' Blog: http://blog.globe.gov/sciblog/2013/01/16/a-tale-of-two-extremes/ Weather extremes have become a common theme in the news headlines the past few weeks. For example, nearly every part of the United States has been experiencing one of two extremes – either frigid cold or record-breaking high temperatures. Places like Arizona and California experienced below-freezing temperatures, which can have potential impacts on the crops grown in these typically balmy regions. In contrast, cities in the Southeast U.S., such as Atlanta,...


Posted in: GLOBE Science Topics: Climate Climate Change Investigation Areas: Atmosphere

Blog originally posted on the GLOBE Scientists' Blog:  http://blog.globe.gov/sciblog/2012/12/19/the-chicken-and-egg-story-of-global-warming-and-extreme-droughts-a-lesson-on-climate-feedbacks/ I recently read that the extreme drought in western North America during 2000-2004 actually resulted in more carbon dioxide being released into the atmosphere. In the article in Nature Geoscience , it explained that such droughts can further enhance global warming. When a drought occurs, the plants wither and die and no longer uptake carbon dioxide (normally living plants serve as a...


Posted in: GLOBE Science Topics: Climate Climate Change

Blog originally posted on The GLOBE Scientists' Blog:  http://blog.globe.gov/sciblog/2012/11/14/esno-basics-what-is-it/ Through many posts here on the Scientists’ Blog, we, in one way or another, discuss ENSO.  ENSO, or El Niño-Southern Oscillation, is a quasi-periodic climate pattern that occurs in the tropical Pacific Ocean.  When the conditions change, the atmosphere responds in many different ways.  In certain locations, it is cloudier and it rains more, while in others it’s clear and dry.  Through our “ENSO Basics” series, we’ll take a look at ENSO in...


Posted in: GLOBE Science Topics: Climate Climate Change General Science